Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Easy, NO Sew Roman Shades (for $4.50!)

*Welcome to all my Pinterest visitors! I've been blogging less than a month, but if you want to see what I still have up my sleeve, follow me!*

The title says it all folks. Do you love roman shades? Do you love the price of roman shades (at least ones with cute fabric)? Do you love how HARD and time consuming and expensive it is to make your own roman shades? Yeah. Me neither.

I have been on the lookout for patterned, cheerful roman shades that won't cost me half my paycheck, for my kitchen for a couple of months now. These ones from West Elm are great, but geez louise, the price!











So one day I was browsing around Target and I found a lovely DwellStudio tablecloth. It was $9 and I KNEW there was a way I could make it into a window treatment. If nothing else, I could use it to make some throw pillows or something.

Fast forward a month and I am browsing on Pinterest. Lo and behold..........a fabulous idea from The Little Green Notebook. No sew roman shades made from CHEAPO MINI BLINDS. YES!

Now, I have a sewing machine, and I like to sew, but like Angela from 365 Days to Simplicity says, "Each and every one has the devil in them". They just are irritating sometimes and like to jam or run out of thread or the bobbin runs out or the needle breaks, or WHATEVER. They like to torment you while you are trying to do a QUICK project. Grrrr! So, I welcome any no-sew project these days. Seeing as I have five kids running around here during the day and I don't like to get angry and yell at my sewing machine in front of them.

Ahhem. Yes. No sew all the way.

Here is the kitchen window before we moved in (not ours yet):
















Here is the window this morning (scallop will go when we do the cabinets):











Annnnnd here it is NOW:

























I am SHOCKED at how nicely they came out. They look professional! They even look nice from the back too. I really can't believe they didn't involve sewing. Our house was full of cheapo mini blinds when we moved in and these two were originally in the first floor bath and laundry room. So those were free. I had the glue and hem tape. AND I have half of the $9 tablecloth fabric left still! So really, they cost me $4.50 for two custom roman shades. Doesn't get much better than that!

Here is the tutorial on how to do it. It may seem like a lot, but they are all simple, short steps. It took me 1.5 hours while watching five children under age 5 for the first one, and 30 minutes for the second one since I knew what I was doing, half the kiddos were sleeping, and I wasn't taking photos.

Sit back, grab something tasty, and follow along!

Here is a shot of everything I used:
Glue (tacky or fabric glue)
Hem Tape
Pen
Scissors
Screwdrivers (for hanging it)
Tape Measure (or ruler)
Butter Knife
Foam Brush










You also need a set of mini blinds and fabric of some sort.

1) Measure your window. I wanted my blinds to be above the molding, not inset into the window frame, since I didn't want to have to cut the blinds I had. I measured the length of the window and added a couple of inches so it would be a bit longer than the window. So 42" long.

2) Open your blinds up all the way:






















3) Remove the ladder cord. As you can see here, blinds have a thicker cord to pull it up and down, and then a thinner, "ladder" cord that holds the slats. You want to remove the ladder. The thick cord in the holes you want to keep, so be sure not to cut that one.
What I did is snip it at the top of the blind, then hold it up and snip snip snip above each slat. It takes all of 2 minutes to do both. Once you cut it, pull it out from the bottom. (Don't mind the dirty slats. I wiped them once I was done).
See, I held it tight as I cut it and just snipped the little piece between each slat.



















Here is what it looks like now, all wonky because now the slats move freely:


















3) Figure out how many slats you need. I wanted my slats to be 6" apart so that my pleats were fairly small. Divide your length, by the inches apart you want them. For me it was 42/6=7. So I need 7, but that includes the top bar and the bottom bar. So really I only need to keep 5 slats.

4) Pry off the round caps on the bottom of the bottom bar. I used a butter knife.

5) Cut or untie the knot and pull it out of the bar. Remove all slats except for the ones you are keeping (so, 5 for mine). Retie the cord into the bar and put the plugs back in. Here is what it looks like now. I just put the slats approx where I wanted them, they are not stuck there or anything.



















6) Lay the open blind on your fabric and cut around it. You need enough room on each side for a hem (and room to glue the top and bottom). So add an extra inch or two to each of the four sides.



















7) I used the blind to make sure the hems were lined up all the way down, nice and straight, ironing the hem down as I go to make sure the hem is nice and crisp.
8) Now that the hem is ironed down, slip the hem tape into the folded hem and iron according to the package. You want the hem tape to be IN the "pocket" that you ironed. Here it is before I closed it back down:

















9) Now that you are all hemmed, lay the blind back on top of the fabric. Lay the top bar down so that the lifting mechanism is face down, touching the fabric.
10) Grab your glue and smear it all over the face of the bar and attach the fabric, overlapping it a bit over the top.
11) Measure out where your slats are going to go. I did mine all 6 inches apart, so I measured and marked with a pen where the top of each slat goes. I measured from the bottom of one slat to the top of the next. I measured and marked on each side of the blind to be sure they line up.
12) Start gluing the slats to the fabric. Glue on the rounded side of the slat and be sure to match up the slats on each side of the fabric. Make sure you don't glue the cord at all, it needs to be able to move.
13) Glue the bottom bar to the fabric, wrapping the fabric around the entire bottom. Sorry I forgot a photo of this step I guess.

14) Let dry. I would like to say I waited overnight for it all to dry, but....I didn't. I waited an hour or so and then hung them up because I was too excited to see the results! They attach to the wall with the original brackets and they go up and down perfectly smooth.

There you have it. My $4.50 set of roman blinds. I really REALLY like them. They are exactly what I was looking for, in a budget I couldn't even have hoped for! After such a successful first attempt, I'll be making ones for our master bath and all the bedrooms in the future. You could also very easily line these if you wanted to. Use the hem tape to attach a liner to the back of the shade, being sure to leave a slit at the top for the cords. I don't need mine to be lined though since I want as much sunlight as possible in my kitchen.

Also, I ran to Target last night, and mini blinds were $3.99! So even if you don't already have some, they are definitely cheap enough that you could buy them brand new and it would still be a very inexpensive project.

Don't be intimidated, it was all VERY simple and pretty easy to put together if you are at all crafty. You know you want to try it. "Pin it" if you love it and "Follow" me for more great ideas to come!
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125 comments:

  1. I REALLY like this idea. Question though...if you do Roman blinds in one room, should you do them in every room, for fluidity, or does it not matter? Although...looking at my current set up, I could just do them in every room. but what are your thoughts?

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    1. I don't think you need to do that at all! My window treatments all involve roman shades, but that is just because I like my windows to be fully covered and I really don't like mini blinds or my curtains closed. :)

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    2. well...I'm taking the plunge and making some...like right now, as i type! (i came on to double check a pic). making then for the bathroom and both excited and nervous :-)

      ps i never sent a pic of my high and wideliving room curtains b/c they were an epic fail :-( turns out my old house can't do high and wide....I'll explain another time.

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  2. I have been wanting to do this ever since you first posted about it on FB ... My only worry is how durable they would be since they are attached with glue. Do you think durability is an issue?? Also, I think your tutorial is much better than the original!! Great job!

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    1. I don't *think* so because all of the usage is really going to the cords. But we'll have to see! Use a strong enough glue (what I used is NOT very strong glue) and I don't think you would ever have an issue. and thank you!!

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    2. I made these a few years ago following Jenny's tutorial and mine have held up great. I even added a lining for more coverage. We are changing up decor now and I just unpeeled the fabric and can reuse it. I used Aleene's fabric glue.

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    3. I just made these yesterday and in testing it up and down I do not like the cord behind the blind. I know it would be nicer hidden but because I had to pull the blind out to access it the glue did not hold the fabric on the end of the slats. I ended up cutting a little opening so the pull cord is on the front and then I don't have to touch them and because they are so much lighter they will not go down all the way on their own so I just put a little pull on the bottom for when I want to close them.

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    4. That's a great idea! Thanks for sharing! Yes. You do have to help pull the bottom a bit when lowering. Worth it for me though! I like that idea of cutting a slit for the cord to go in front...

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  3. These look great! Fabulous job!

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  4. Found this post through Pinterest! This type of project is exactly what I have been looking for my sunroom, since our quote for custom roman shades was over $2000! What a great tutorial. Thank you so much, can't wait to try it!

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    1. WOW! That is craziness!! Glad to help, and good luck!

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    2. After reading this DIY, I plan to do this in my sunroom, too! Pricing out any type of curtains for a room full of windows was proving to be WAY more than I was willing to spend! This is the perfect solution. Thank you for sharing!!

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  5. Great tutorial! I've been wanting to get a new window covering in our guest bathroom but making these will be so much cuter than what I can find locally.

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  6. if you were really concerned about longevity, it would seem like you could add velcro to the fabric and the slat, which would also make them washable or you could change them out for holidays etc. seems like the velcro would stick perfectly to the slat (you may want to rub with alcohol to clean first) not sure that the velcro would stick to the fabric but it seems like it would and while I love the idea of no sewing, since i absolutely don't, one could sew the velcro to the fabric. Absolutely love this idea, thanks

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    1. Great thinking! I'm not a big window treatment washer (yikes! Did I just admit that??), but I agree that it would be a very handy idea. If you used the sticky velcro, it would be even easier than glue!

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    2. just an fyi do not try sewing sticky velcro with a machine. the glue on the velcro will jam your machine and break your needles...they sell velcro without stickiness...though when you sew it it will give you a line on the design also...

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  7. I think if the window has full sun a light weight,white lining might help from the material fading. I like your shade then some I've seen in stores.

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    1. Thank you! I agree with the lining. My window is north facing though so I don't get a ton of direct sunlight that I would have to worry about it. I definitely will be adding a lightweight liner to my south facing bedroom windows!

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  8. I was just about to throw away some blinds because my dog did a number on them. Not now! The top of the blind is in perfect condition so it is absolutely doable. What a great way to use old blinds. Thanks so much for the tutorial.

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  9. At least in the photos, I think the scallop looks pretty with your window shades. Thanks for a great idea!

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  10. Love the tutorial, you make it look soooo easy :)
    mickey

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  11. What if you don't have mini blinds but you have the white faux wood slat blinds....can you still do this project??

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    1. Yes ma'am you can! I am pretty sure they are exactly the same, just wood/faux wood. So I don't see why not. Good luck!

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    2. Hey, if you have wood slats, could you use small decorative tacks on the glue/velcro line as accent? or would that get in the way? These are so cool...I have mini-blinds in my craft room, but my cats are always in the windows messing with them. I bet I can find a slick fabric that won't attract cat fur, and this will be a great fix!

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  12. I found you via Pinterest and am now a follower. GREAT tutorial!

    Aimee
    Wonderfully Domestic

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  13. I love love this new use of old mini blinds. I am glad someone was able to figure out then explain to those of us who love these kinds of projects but lack the creativity to figure out how to make it work. I wish there was a solution for the old vertical blinds, too

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    1. Wouldn't that be great?? We actually tossed the vertical blinds that came on our deck slider when we bought the house, YUCK! They were all broken and funky. Thanks!

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    2. i had some vertical blinds that i hated...i cut a bamboo print fabric exactly the size of the slats and glued it to each one with elmers glue.my daughter now has custom vertical blinds that look like bamboo....i also glued the fabric to the top horizontal bar.

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  14. What did you do for the few inches of fabric above the blinds?

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    1. I tucked my fabric up and over the top mechanism. I couldn't decide how I wanted to deal with the blind brackets (if that is what you mean), but I think I am going to make a tiny 3" valance of sorts to cover the the very top of the blinds. :)

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    2. Make a valance and attach it to the top rail with velcro or use the iron on tape (on the top where no one will see it). Love this tut...well done!!

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  15. Thanks for sharing! Look great...can't wait to try!

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  16. You did a great job! As for the scalloped wooden apron, I have one that(unbeknownst to hubby) is coming down this next week. I don't know if you have ever considered painting your cabinets or not but it is another great savings. I'm doing mine again this weekend in RED and I also paint the countertops to mimic a swatch from Lowes. I've done these things twice before...it all holds up so well. I love that every 3 or 4 years I can do a total kitchen makeover with paint.

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    1. Thanks! We actually are planning on painting our cabinets white! It is a huge project for us though because the Mr. Man used to be a pro painter. So it will be an extensive undertaking! Good luck with yours!

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    2. Anita, How do you paint counter tops, and do you have to coat them with something? I have Formica, and they need paint or replaced due to age. I really can not afford to replace them, so I have been trying to find any ideas. Thank you!

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    3. I am also interested in painting counter tops. I've seen some special product made for this use but it's still not inexpensive at $70 so I wondered if that's what you used or some cheaper way?

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    4. I have painted my bathroom counter (old bumpy formica) and it works well for bumps and smooth. I used this type of paint that cost about $20: http://www.rustoleum.com/CBGProduct.asp?pid=208

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  17. Love this tutorial! I am definitely going to try this! We have a very tall back door with a very long window. I have been trying to find a shade for it without spending a ton of money and this is the perfect solution! Thanks for making this tutorial!

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  18. It was truly an easy no sew roman shades. I think that it would be great to make my own roman shades at home. I know that I would be able to make that roman shades through those simple steps.

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  19. I have some narrow windows that finding ready made roman shades were impossible which left only custom made ones that were outrageous. Even roman shades kits made the cost unreasonable as I like to change out window treatments frequently. This is a fabulous idea!

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  20. Love your fabric. I was wondering if the fabric I purchased to do this tutorial would have to be thicker than the regular apparel fabric. Thanks.

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    1. Thanks! The fabric I used was a tablecloth so it was a thicker home decor fabric, yes. You could definitely use regular quilting/apparel fabric though. You could line it to thicken it a bit if you wanted. I think it is nice with home dec though because it gives it more stiffness. Good luck!

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  21. heath, how much fabric do you need? my kitchen window is very very wide, should I just mount two mini blinds side by side and then do two roman shades side by side!?

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    1. I used two romans side by side, yes. I like the look of two, and I think it is easier to do two smaller ones rather than one super large one. For fabric, just measure how big you want the roman to be, and add about 2 inches on each of the four sides. :)

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  22. love this idea with the old blinds. Bear with me...please. The photo that shows you putting the glue on with a sponge brush... well do you turn that over and press onto the fabric or cut a piece to go on top? I just don't get it.
    thanks to the tutorial.
    susan

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    1. Thanks Susan! Yes, I flipped it over and glued it to the fabric. Good luck with yours!

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  23. i just have a quick question about lining the shade. would you just back the fabric and the lining back to back or could you put the lining on the outside making the slats be between the fabric and the liner? i think i would like the look better (from outside the window) if the slats were covered, but i wonder if this would affect the way it rolls up or anything?

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    1. I think when I do it for our South windows, I will sandwich the slats in between the fabric layers. Just gluing on the other side. I dont think it will affect the way it opens, but we'll see! I'll post how it goes when I do it myself. =)

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  24. Found you on pinterest tonight. I love this idea, love your before and after shots. I am now a new follower :) have a great night!!

    Connie
    Dancing With Words
    conniemfink.blogspot.com

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  25. I just found you on Pinterest and can't wait for more blogs!! I am a novice when it comes to projects like these, but I am definitely going to give it a try!! Do you have any ideas for covering up sliding doors??

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  26. How much fabric did you use for one shade? The fabric I want to do my shades in are about $10 a yard so I want to be sure I get enough fabric (considering I have 8 windows in my kitchen alone)

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    1. Well, I used two shades for my window and each shade was 46" long and 18" wide. Adding 2 inches per side for the hems, makes it 50x22. Since I used a tablecloth for the fabric, I'm not sure what the exact yardage was. You can measure your window, and add 2 inches per side to get the amount you would need. Good luck!

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  27. Wow, this is brilliant idea. I will try this, it will only costs me cheaper than the original price. I will have to choose different color than yours but the installation is perfect to try.

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  28. What about the other side? Wouldn't the slates be exposed to the outside view? Great tutorial by the way. You did great!

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    1. Yes they are visible. But it doesn't look bad at all. It certainly looks better than the mini blinds did from outside. That said, it is very easy to add a liner to the back if you want. This window is north facing and in our backyard so I wasn't worried about it. Just use hem tape to attach a backing. :) good luck and thank you!

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  29. I love this! This is so Awesome! Thank you for sharing! Is it possible to use your roman shade tutorial for other roman shade styles like an elegant Austrian Style shade(website for picture reference www.make-roman-shades.com/kits.php)or the Shabby Chic balloon style without dragging out the sewing machine? I know I would need more fabric but how would I make the gathers or poofyness without sewing?

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    1. Hmmmmm...If you sewed them, it would be easy, but without sewing, I really don't think you can do those style romans. Sadly. GOod luck and if you give it a try, let me know!

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  30. I have wooden blinds. but want something different in my little kitchen window and bay window. Do you think Wooden blinds would work the same way?

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    1. Yes, I think they would work in the same way. I am pretty sure that wooden blinds have the same design. As long as the slats aren't TOO wide, I think it would look the same. GOod luck!!

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  31. Just superb! Thanks for the fabulously detailed tute!

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  32. I found you on Pinterest and now I've been stalking your page...lol :)Love this idea!!! Great tutorial..

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  33. Love everything about this. Very Clever! Love the scalloped wood and the new light you put in.

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  34. Wow, this is fabulous!! I'm very eager to try... Thanks a ton for the great tutorial!! Visit my blog as well,

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  35. OMG! I just made these and LOVE LOVE LOVE them!!! You are amazing! My kitchen window has been a point of contention for quite some time now and you may have saved my marriage! lol

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    1. Ahhh hilarious!! YAY! So glad to hear I could help! You should send me a photo to take a peek! =)

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  36. Quick question...what did you do with the little "thingy" on the top left that the long stick attatches to when you turn the direction of the blind? I'm stuck on that part...Do you just break it off?

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    1. yep I just snapped that baby right off!

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  37. I'm in the middle of this project and have encountered a problem... I removed the ladder cords and thought I would test out the pulling cord before attaching the fabric. When I pull on the pull cord, the slats will raise but the pull cord doesn't stay "locked" so the slats just fall back down. It is a brand new mini blind that measures 36" wide and 64" long. Have you encountered this problem and do you have a solution? Your help would be greatly appreciated!

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    1. I'm not 100% sure what you mean, but I don't think you have to worry about anything at this point. Make sure you pull the cord to the left to raise it, then all the way to the right to lock it. I don't think it will work 100% until you have it all glued together. Good luck!

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    2. Thanks for your reply. Yes, I do pull the cord to the left to raise it, but when I pull to the right to lock, it's not staying locked so the slats fall. I'm going to start over with a new blind. Another question: do you trim the pull cord if you want to shorten the overall length? Like yours, I'm also doing a 42" length.

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    3. Hmmmmm, weird. Maybe it's defective, I didn't try raising or lowering them at that stage, so I'm not really sure how they act at that point. In terms of the pull cord, I trimmed it when I was completely done. I lowered the shade to the lowest point I would ever use it, and then trimmed it. I hope it turns out well for you!

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    4. I think the problem is that the fabric wasn't attached yet.. Think about it the blinds have the ladder to keep them on track but the slats don't have that so it won't work until the fabric is attached to hold them in place.

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  38. Hi, I just made these after following your tutorial and they look adorable hanging in my bathroom! Thank you for a great and easy to follow lesson!! However, I had a problem arise while installing them. My "brackets" have 3 closed sides and one open side that faces out. You slide the blinds in and then there is a piece that slides in on the open side (once blinds are placed in) to enclose the edge of the blinds to make them secure (so they don't fall down when you pull the cord), but if I can't really get this last piece on because I have fabric covering the top of the front of the blinds (step 10) that falls over the front of the bracket and even if I could get the securing piece on it doesn't look good because it covers the fabric in each corner. I'm not sure what to do. Right now my blinds are just set into the U shaped brackets, but nothing is really keeping them from falling down if the cord is tugged. Ugh, this is so hard to explain without visuals. Did you have this problem? Perhaps your blinds attached differently?? Anyway, I have thought about at least adding velcro or something behind each end to secure them better into the brackets--I am nervous my 3 year old or 14 year old will give a tug and they'll fall on their heads ;) Just thought I'd check to see if you had a similar problem or a solution. Thanks again. I plan to make more for my kitchen soon...once I solve this problem!!

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    1. Yes, what I did was unglue the fabric where the brackets would go. Then I slid the bracket pieces in to secure and then I glued the fabric directly on top of the sliding piece. You could also use sticky back velcro.

      On the shade I made for my bedroom, I added a small valance to the top of the blinds too, just to further hide the top. I just used the same fabric and folded a piece to be about 2 inches wide. Then I attached it to the top bracket with velcro.

      Does that make sense?

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    2. thanks a ton, that makes total sense! I will try one of those ideas on my next set of shades. Also, just FYI, I used E-6000 glue (recommended to me by a lady at Joanns for this project)and it worked great. It's industrial strength...so if anyone is worried about durability, I don't think you can get more durable than that :)

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    3. Great!! That is definitely some SERIOUS glue! Good luck!

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  39. LOVE LOVE LOVE this! I found the idea on Pinterest and now I MUST try this project this weekend! I love the tablecloth you used...I have the matching quilt and it is so bright and cheery! Thanks for the GREAT idea!

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    1. Thank you and glad to help! I love the fabric too, so sunny. Good luck!

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  40. Gonna do this in my kitchen...the professional estimate nearly killed me. I know I can find some fabric I like and will be able to do something cute for a fraction of professional shades. Thanks!

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  41. Great idea. I have made the sewn Roman blinds but like the idea that no sewing is involved. I find plasticised material hard to use on my machine, so this could be the answer.

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  42. I bought this exact same table cloth at Target a few months ago for $5. I knew I wanted to make a roman blind out of it for small door in our house. So, I'm just now getting around to looking for a tutorial, and what do you know? I find THIS exact fabric in a roman blind tutorial. WEIRD!! Thanks so much! I'm so excited to get to work!

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    1. HA! Awesome!! Glad to help, good luck!!
      xo
      h

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  43. I've been procrastinating this idea, but I REALLY love roman shades so I knew it was something I wanted to do on a day I was in the "right" mood. Boy, am I glad I did! I bought an extra panel of the very cute curtains I hung in our living room to convert to roman shades. I did have to turn the pattern sideways but it still looks great! http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u147/amandacj08/photo.jpg

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    1. WOW!!! I LOVE! They look fantastic, great job! Very cute fabric too. I also like how you added the slit for the cord to be in front. Nice work! Thanks for visiting!
      xo
      h

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  44. If you end up with a blind that doesn't want to lower because it is too light in weight you can always weight the bottom bar. I took a piece of metal rebar which is available at a home improvement store and slid it into the opening in the bottom bar. If you had some fishing weights it may be enough to work also. This way they will come down without having to reach up and pull on them.

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  45. Thank you so much for sharing your roman blind. I've been wanting to make roman blinds so I've been looking for an easier way to make them, I now found it! YEAH!

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  46. Thank you. Thank You. first off I am not crafty but was inspired by reading your tutorial and deciided to go out this morning and pick up fabric for My son's room which one wall is red and the others are tan. I have not been able to fine new bedding since we repainted. So we have blue bedding. I took my soon to the fabric store he picked the fabric, a red, tan, green and blue plaid. He said it had all his favorite colors. 2 and half hours later I finished my new roman shades. They cost $20.00. Thank you again

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  47. Hi Heather! Great job!! LOVE this...I hope you don't mind, but I put a link on my DIY page on my website!! (if you want to see where it's located: http://www.pamelasandalldesign.com/handylink/)

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  48. Love this tutorial! I am definitely going to try this! We have a very tall back door with a very long window. I have been trying to find a shade for it without spending a ton of money and this is the perfect solution! Thanks for making this tutorial!
    Property Surveyor Birmingham, AL

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  49. Hi,
    These roman shades are awesome! I am attempting to make some for the front bay windows in my home. However, since it is the front windows I dont want the blinds and the back of the fabric to show out our window. Is there a way to glue the fabric all around the blinds to have "double sided" roman shades?

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  50. The easy no sew blinds rea beautiful/ have a look at them

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  51. Nice result! Tutorials always make it look so simple, and when I try to do it, I'm surprised at how much goes into it. Just so I can be realistic in my attempt and so I can budget my time, how long did it take you to make these?

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    1. Hi! It took me an hour and a half the first time I ever made them, and 30 minutes each subsequent time. Good luck and I'd love to see a photo when you do one!!
      xoxo
      h

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  52. Thank you for this amazing tutorial! I just attempted my own roman shade but had a problem...I used tacky glue like you did and it shows through the fabric...even when it was dry. Everything else worked out great but it looks terrible due to the glue. Any suggestions? It doesn't seem like anyone else had this problem. It was a thinner fabric so maybe a thicker curtain fabric would be better?

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    1. Hmmm, bummer!! I would think your fabric must be too thin. What a bummer! I use home dec weight fabric, so it is slightly thicker with a light canvas feel. Mine have always been made out of things like a tablecloth or curtain panels (all from Target). Also, if it was a lighter color, I would imagine that probably would exacerbate the problem. Good luck next time!

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    2. Thanks for your input. It must have been the fabric I used. Thankfully it was something I just had laying around and was practicing with :). I will try again with different/thicker fabric.

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    3. I made these today and the same thing happened to me. I even read all the comments first to make sure I didn't miss a good tip! I used a dark, heavyweight tablecloth, but it was a woven style. Not as loose as burlap, for example, and not gauzy, but still loosely woven. Anyway, the glue showed through in about 10 different places, so I obviously didn't spread it well enough and that's where it collected.

      At first I was sooooo bummed out. But here's my fix. My tablecloth is woven from all sorts of different shades of hunter green. My blinds are cream. From outside, the contrast of the cream slats on the hunter fabric is really noticeable. I had planned on "eventually" lining the back, sandwich style as suggested. But instead I have peeled off my otherwise PERFECT front, and am now using it as a back. I have to make another one for the front now, and I haven't quite decided if I will just skimp on the glue or try another brand.

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  53. Pretty good post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wanted to say that I have really enjoyed reading your blog posts.

    shades marblehead

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  54. Hi Heather, beautiful job. Did you ever make another set of these roman shades using a liner? I want to make them but am concerned about the slats showing from the outside. Curious if anyone has made them and lined them by putting the slats between the decorator fabric & the liner. If so, how did you do it and do the shades still move up and down well? Thanks so much, mkraich@bellsouth.net

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  55. I just finished my shade but it's folding from the top instead of the bottom. Any suggestions?

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  56. I am planning to decorate my home with using different color combinations. I also think to change my curtains and then suddenly my friend suggests me about venetian blinds that look very trendy in our rooms. So, please update more designs of all type blinds.

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  57. Hi Heather!
    I'm so excited to discover this project as I have a cute cottage with an abundance of windows! And we rent so I don't want to spend oodles of money on them. I'm thinking of using old beach mats to make our roman shades. In your opinion would the mini blind slats be enough support to hold the weight? Or should I double the amount of slats left and glue together? Also is there a tacky glue that dries clear? As I'm concerned as the other blogger wrote that the glue would show thru on the front. Thanks so much for posting this!

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  58. Thanks for the information. I think those window shades are really simple and nice. I like it. Easy to install and make.

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  59. Love your tutorial. I just purchased fabric and liner at Joann's for 50 percent off plus an additional 20 percent off for seniors. There are some great perks to being a senior:) anyways, I want to make these Roman blinds with a liner but I need to get instructions on how to do this. Help!

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  60. Heather, I was wondering how long ago you found this tablecloth? I would love to use it for my bedroom and not sure if it will be around.
    Lisa Behsman

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  61. I'm not so fond of sewing and I think that it is hassle so this is just right for me. I wanna create my own design for window shades and I'm gonna follow your simple steps. Thanks!

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  62. I JUST MADE ONE FOR MY KITCHEN WINDOW! I love it, I have to buy another blind for the other window. Great idea thanks!

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  63. This is genius- I have been looking for an easy roman shade tutorial for some time. They are so hard to make traditionally. Thanks a ton for sharing this!!

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  64. Wonderful design for the home! It's really easy to follow on your instructions too and do my own window shades. This is much more practical than buying an expensive one.

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  65. I'm not so fond of sewing and I think that it is hassle so this is just right for me. I wanna create my own design for window shades and I'm gonna follow your simple steps. Thanks!

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  66. This a great idea..I have mini blinds in my guest room which I will be repurposing into roman shades.Thanks for the tutorial.I have an idea about the cord..some one said they cut a slit so the cord is in the front which I do prefer, I plan on attacing a small vallance on the top rail to cover the cord hole.I plan on using an old table cloth for the project.Thanks.

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  67. Was curious if certain fabrics work better than others i.e. cotton, damask, silk? Love the tutorial - can't wait to try this.

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  68. WOW I was so excited to see this just passing by. I love projects and I needed to find
    a way to cover all mini blined windows in a mobile home that the people abused badly. This will give a face lift to the place and cover the windows.. Thanks so much for this project!

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  69. Thank you SO much for posting this! My mom and I have wasted many hours doing it the old fashioned way (cutting/measuring/sewing) but this way was SO easy! It took us about an hour for one shade (we did a practice round on cheap muslin to get used to the method) but found it to be extrememly quick and easy to do. I am so mad I wasted so much time and money to do it the other way! Great tutorial!

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  70. I am THRILLED!! My husband and I recently bought our first home - a foreclosure fixer-upper. We had contractors do a lot of work, gutting the kitchen and bathrooms to the studs, knocking down walls, sanding and re-staining hardwoods throughout, etc. After the bog work, the rest is up to us! We've been painting and decorating for months, but we're finally getting there. And THIS post leaves the hallelujah chorus singing in the background as I enter my kitchen. I was struggling to find roman shades that would fit my style and our budget (I definitely want a fun pattern). Along came your blog, and I'm set! I just finished TWO blinds for our two kitchen windows and I'm in heaven! Thank you, girl! I love your projects. Keep the information coming! :-)

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  71. I have some old Mini blinds that are a few inches narrower than the new windows, so they do not cover the entire window. they are maybe 1.5 inches short on either side. Do you think they could be still used to make the shades?

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  72. These are really beautiful! I love the fabric you chose. I have bay windows and window treatments are very expensive so finding a simple and inexpensive solution is awesome! Thanks so much!

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Thanks for your feedback!